I am a mom, but I am also a speech-language pathologist, and my education and my career have given me a different perspective on what these advantages are and how to give my daughter a headstart.

Sibling rivalry is complex and can last a lifetime. Children frequently feel that a parent may favor their sibling or just feel that their brother or sister is “better at everything.”Here are some tips to try to bring more balance into your home and help each child feel special and appreciated for who they are.

When I was taking my daughter to parent/child classes for infants and toddlers I made a lot of new "mommy" friends. Most of them would find out sooner or later what I do, and frequently they asked me what I thought about infants and toddlers watching TV and educational DVDs. I still get that question a lot, so it seems many parents wonder the same thing.

I always turn my radar up a bit when I see a one-year-old sitting in his high chair, being fed by his parent and spotless — not a mess under the high chair, not a stain on his bib, not a speck on his tray. Well-meaning parents try to spare their child (and themselves) the mess by continuing to spoon feed their little one.

Driving is something most people do every day. You drive your children to school, camp, daycare, the grocery store. I don't know about you, but I probably spend at least 40 minutes a day in the car with my daughter and although sometimes I appreciate some silence in the car, I also love to spend that time with her playing fun games.

Talking and Reading go hand in hand. Here are some of my favorite activities to transform your home in a language and literacy rich environment. They all promote being exposed to letters, expanding language skills and having experiences with reading and writing. I tried to group them according to a targeted skill but they all overlap. Have fun!